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How a Simple, Powerful and Persistent Message to the Media Gained Client, Alsbridge, Coverage in “The Wall Street Journal”, “BusinessWeek, “CIO Magazine” and Many Others

One of the common messaging themes that we’ve worked withDsc_3615_2
client, Alsbridge, is that of innovation in outsourcing and in particular, its SAS (Sourcing Alignment System) service offering.

No, we did not pitch stories about how to get the best price or the cheapest labor to get the job done.  The  scope, configuration and location of today’s outsourcing engagements often extends across all corporate functions and geographies.

A Messaging Strategy with a Simple, Powerful, and Persistent Message to the Media

According to our client’s research, the answer started at the beginning of the process where open collaboration between buyers and sellers must take precedence over typical, paper-based request for proposal (RFP) processes. 

In our pitches to the media, we took the position that Alsbridge’s vision was to help the client and the provider establish a truly sustainable deal using a proven process which eliminates friction.

Our goal was to show how Alsbridge was taking sourcing to the next level as a third generation sourcing advisory firm, which evaluates all sourcing alternatives, and focuses on aligning the right combination of governance and delivery models to meet clients’ individual needs.

And This Process Did Not Happen Overnight.  The Wall Street Journal, BusinessWeekCIO Magazine and Others Each Took Five to Seven Months of Outreach to Achieve

1. In the case of the coverage in last week’s online edition of CIO, I personally made this pitch back in February.

It took a series of discussions, timed and well planned pitches, and a bit of patience to gain the editor’s confidence that our client was indeed a trusted and knowledgeable source.  After an interview with Alsbridge CEO, Ben Trowbridge, the article appeared two months later. 

Not only was the article well done, but the magazine used our client’s research to support our theme of innovation in outsourcing. 

2.  In the case of the story in "The Wall Street Journal," the story was not about outsourcing, but rather a look at EDS’ Agility Alliance program and quoted Ben Trowbridge as an expert source for the story which you may view here:

Download hire_eds_get_microsoft_oracle_sun… – WSJ.com copy.pdf

This pitch was made as the result of reaching out to several Journal writers who covered outsourcing.

I worked with staff writers in the U.S. and India making inquiries until I struck a chord with one writer who happened to be doing the piece on EDS.  I offered Ben as source and gently reminded the writer that Alsbridge’s Chairman and lead investor, Mort Meyerson, was the former Vice Chairman and President of EDS.

3.  InformationWeek did a story on our pitch where we identified the next top ten cities for outsourcing in India.

4.  BusinessWeek did a profile on Mort Meyerson and his vision of collaboration in outsourcing trends.

The unfortunate reality of what I do for a living is that it just takes time to show results.  I am just selling someone’s vision, someone’s idea, someone’s hope to change or reinvent and in many cases, disrupt an industry.

I have a pretty good sense of what makes a great (not just a good) story.  In the case of Alsbridge, having the opportunity to sit at the table with someone like Mort and Ben, I knew they were on to something really big – and a great story to tell – given what I call the media selling cycle ample time.

My advise: 

  1. Trust your instinct
  2. Try a variety of short and concise pitches
  3. Offer help, research and sources to the writer so you can be part of the bigger story
  4. Be patient
  5. Give this process the most precious commodity of all: time.

Wood sculpture shot on location at The Musee d’ Orsay, Paris by Alan Weinkrantz (c) 2005 All Rights Reserved.

 

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