Israel: 054-321-6176 / USA - 210-820-3070 alan@weinkrantz.com

PR 101 Tip…

A security startup from Israel reaches out to me asking for some basic advise. Happy to help out a bit. They have a way to stop some type of virus and they wanted to know who they should pitch to. Actually, they asked me to do this for them “….as a favor….” I advised them to turn on a Google News alert and see who might be covering it. Logic often times rules the day. They wound up send three pitches and got no response. My response was: 1. The news cycle may have already passed. 2. Your “product” may not be a product; it may be a feature. 3. The fact that you do one thing really well, may not be newsworthy. 4. Keep trying — but instead of “pitching,” try listening and try reading the content of the journalists you will want to reach out to for the next opportunity. 5. Offer to help them with insights, advise, and experiences you are seeing in how you are helping your customers prevent from being hurt by this virus. It may not get you immediate coverage, but if you are helpful and think about casting a wider net, you may gain some unexpected and delightful results. Photo by me. Shot several years ago at a mercado in Mexico...

The First Thing Every Startup Should Do Before You Ever Even Think About PR…

I am going to borrow from a term coined by my friend, Chris Brogan. Before you start off on any type of PR initiative, grow bigger ears.   Don’t Pitch.  Start Listening First. Get inside the heads of the journalists, bloggers and industry analysts you think should be covering your company.  How?  Read their content.  And I don’t mean the last article they wrote.  Go back in time.  Read a minimum of the last six months of their work and get a feel for what they write about, who they have covered, and perhaps what they may be missing out on, and in turn, why your story would be compelling to them. Invest $100 in MuckRack I have a subscription to MuckRack.  It costs $100 per month and you can go month to month.  Try it for one month and discover who is writing about the space you’re in, the companies you may compete with, key words and terms that fit your space, and subject matter that may be on the periphery of what you do. Muckrack lets you build lists which are downloadable.  You can connect with journalists, analysts and bloggers via their social profiles, and search for their email addresses which are easy to find. As you go through this process, you’ll find that you will not only have a much better understanding for who should possibly cover you, but what’s on their minds, what are trending topics and where you might come up with a great angle about something compelling and interesting that would merit your getting on their radar. Allow yourself 90 days of doing...