Israel: 054-321-6176 / USA - 210-820-3070 alan@weinkrantz.com

PR Contact Database Services Like Pressfarm Are Great…If Applied Correctly.

And now Pressfarm gets in the game of offering a subscription-based model, where for $9 per month, you can get twitter handles and email addresses for leading tech journalists. If you’re a startup in search of fame and glory you think this is the greatest thing since spam was invented. Well, maybe not. Services like Pressfarm are great for research first, and pitching last. Before you start, ask yourself the following: 1.  Is our startup ready for coverage? There is no universal answer.  Some of you will want to stay off the radar.  Others with something really compelling and a possible great story idea, or even real news – i.e. funding, major win, major milestone, etc. could merit exploring the idea of coverage. 2.  What is the goal of getting coverage? Ask yourself this hard and very tough question.  If it’s for vanity, then spend your time elsewhere.  If you really have a valid reason why you think coverage would benefit your startup and your team, then by all means consider the idea. 3.  Are the publications that Pressfarm covers appropriate for your startup? While TechCrunch, Mashable, and The New York Times would be great places to get covered, remember that you are competing for the noise and attention of journalists who get hundreds of emails and pitches per day. Oh… if you need an list of the staff at TechCrunch, click here.  Most of the other publications are easy to reach as well. 4.  Use Pressfarm to research and discover, and then later to pitch. I am not slamming Pressfarm.  But I do think their pitch “Find journalists...

How To Hack Your Startup’s Public Relations Strategy

Over the last three years, I have had to opportunity to speak and mentor startups at major accelerators in the U.S., Israel, Palestine, Mexico, Chile and Argentina. In doing so, I began to see a pattern evolve where the idea of doing what is typically thought of as “PR” tended to be something that may or may not be addressed until few weeks before launch, if ever. I am of the belief that PR should be part of your development and marketing strategy. Don’t confuse PR with your message, gaining traction, growth hacking, crushing it, killing it, being awesome and every other term du jur that litters the startup landscape. It’s about an approach I call “Above The Code” which helps you enter a zone that’s away from everything that is coded, measured, and quantified. It’s about listening, being human, and getting in tune where you believe your story could and should be told. Early on, PR is not about getting coverage. It’s about finding your voice, understanding what the world at-large is writing about and trends being covered, and where your startup could belong in the conversation. When To Start. Approximately six months before you are ready to launch your startup’s first product, service or platform, Public Relations should be part of your strategic planning and branding. The idea here is not to seek out media coverage. You’re too early in the cycle for it and even if you were to gain coverage, you may not have anything to really offer your customers and partners to be. Ready. Set. Go! There are five key steps you can take...

When The Receiving End Isn’t “Ready.”

There are going to be times when in the process of pitching and doing outreach,  the receiving end is just not ready. The receiving end might be a journalist or blogger you already know and even have a relationship with. It might be someone you discovered who has an expressed an interest in your company that “could” lead to coverage. But They Are Just Not Ready It could be backlog.  It might be the case of their doing research on a trend and your timing was right.  Or it could be breaking news that they have to cover and your story was cast aside for a while.  Or maybe forever. There’s nothing you can do to control or own the outcome.   But there is one thing you can do. You Can Be Ready. Have a body of work. Be discoverable. Post useful and most of all, helpful content so that when the receiving end is ready, you’ll be there at the top of list of helpful and insightful...

Before You Hire a PR or Social Media Consultant, Think About This…

So you've got your budget in place, lots of new initiatives under way and your company is ready to top the charts with news and buzz. That's all fine and good, but you gotta have more than that.   You have to have an internal resource – often not the VP of Marketing who can be a go to person who can take ownership of the client / agency relationship. Years ago, PR was pretty much handled by a VP of Marketing or the Director of Marketing Communications.  We developed communications strategies, wrote traditional press releases, did outreach to the media and industry analysts and it all worked very well. Now, with Social Media, the team and the nature of what we do has expanded.  There is a shift to voices – and having multiple voices in a company.  Often times, it's in real time. The voice of my clients are found on Blogs, conversations on other blogs, Facebook, Twitter, Wikipedia and yes, in industry analyst reports and traditional media.   Before you move forward, it's important to make sure that if I call on an internal resource for product information, technology clarification, input on messaging, availability to be interviewed, or integration with your IT department for social media initiatives, everyone on the team has buy-in and is willing to make the time to integrate strategic PR and Social Communications into the...

“Presence is the New Dial Tone” (by me); “You Shall Know Us By Our Dial Tone” (by Chris Brogan)

I met Chris Brogan through Jeff Pulver.  Like so many in Jeff's sphere of friends, they are not only smart, but very nice people.  Ditto for Chris Brogan.   It's personally gratifying when I write something in my column for the San Antonio Express-News and then I see someone like Chris thinking in the same vein elsewhere and in a different format. Here is my column on "Presence being the New Dial Tone".  Below is Chris Brogan's presentation, "You Shall Know us By Our Dial Tone." you shall know us by our dialtone View more presentations from...